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The 10 Freshest Food Trends For 2019

Out with the old, and in with the new! We’ve searched far and wide to bring you our predictions on the freshest food trends for 2019. Here’s a sneak peak at what you can expect in the coming year...


  1. CBD & Hemp-based produce

CBD oil, also known as cannabidiol, or hemp oil, is the big one for 2019. This non-psychoactive extract from hemp plants has some great potential health benefits, namely in how it could lessen the symptoms of stress, anxiety, and physical pain. Hemp is officially going mainstream!


  1. Ketogenic diets & healthy fats

Low-carb, high-fat diets like the ketogenic and paleo diets have experienced a surge in popularity, and “healthy fats” are trending for 2019. Alternative fat sources, specifically those not from grains or animal products, are becoming more prominent too – look out for coconut products such as MCT oil and coconut butter, and ghee, a type of butter popular in South-east Asian cooking.


  1. Plant-based diets & mainstream veganism

With vegetarianism and veganism becoming increasingly popular each year, expect to see a higher focus on plant-based diets and meat alternatives. The idea here is to decrease the amount of animal products you consume, if not to cut them out entirely, for both health and ethical reasons. Look out for a rise in plant proteins, which are far more eco-friendly to produce compared to raising animals for meat.


  1. Eco-conscious packaging

So long, single use! Following the plastic bag charge and drinking straw bans, more and more retailers are making an effort to reduce plastic waste, and focus more on eco-friendly food packaging. At home, too, traditional cling film and plastic sandwich bags are on the way out, and reusable food wraps made from beeswax and waxed canvas are in.


  1. Zero Food Waste

Along with an effort to reduce food packaging waste, there’s also a movement to cut down on the amount of food itself being wasted. “Ugly” or otherwise imperfect-looking produce, agricultural water-saving production technology, and creatively reusing leftovers, are all steps in the right direction.


  1. Shelf-Stable Probiotics

2019 will be all about gut flora! The digestive health benefits of foods containing probiotics will be a huge focus for health-conscious foodies this year. Expect a new strain of probiotics that can be stored at room temperature to be added to foods such as granola and oatmeal. Fermented foods rich in naturally-occurring probiotics, such as kimchi and kombucha, have already experienced a surge in popularity in the last few years, but look out for new takes on these classics, and wider availability.


  1. Sea-based superfoods

Following the rise in popularity of seaweed snacks, more water-based plants are looking to be a nutrient-packed addition to our menus. Kelp, algae, water lily seed snacks, and crispy salmon skins rich in Omega-3 are definitely on the radar for 2019.


  1. New Pacific flavours

Recipe inspiration from the Pacific Rim is going to be huge this year. Tropical fruits such as passion fruit, dragon fruit, and guava, are the flavour profile of the year, while jackfruit, and monk fruit extracts, will provide healthier meat and sugar alternatives.


  1. Natural ingredients & reduced sugar

With a greater number of us becoming aware of the myriad of health risks associated with high sugar consumption, there looks to be a movement towards healthier treats with lower sugar content, fewer processed ingredients, and vibrant natural food dyes. All in all, a huge indicator of the healthier direction food production is moving in.


  1. Better transparency

Food retailers and producers are steadily increasing the amount of data available for their available products. Information on how far produce has travelled to reach the shelves, how meat animals were raised, and how local farmers around the world benefit from business, will all become more accessible, allowing us to make more informed decisions on the food we buy.

December 28, 2018 — Eleni Mills

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